cryptography

Evening Read

Rachel B. Doyle dubs Thomas Jefferson “the Father of American Cryptography”:
As a youth in the Virginia colony, Jefferson encrypted letters to a confidante about the woman he loved. While serving as the third president of the newly formed United States, he tried to institute an impossibly difficult cipher for communications about the Louisiana Purchase. He even designed an intricate mechanical system for coding text that was more than a century ahead of its time.
Cryptography was no parlor game for the idle classes, but a serious business for revolutionary-era statesmen who, like today’s politicians and spies, needed to conduct their business using secure messaging. Codes and ciphers involving rearranged letters, number substitutions, and other now-quaint methods were the WhatsApp, Signal, and PGP keys of the era.
Keep reading here, as Doyle uncovers the Founding Fathers’ secret messages.

Comments

My best work

REVIEW: Janice L. Loper 5.0 out of 5 stars Emotional. Truthful. Intensely absorbing. Eloquent. November 29, 2018 Format: Kindle Edition You get such an emotional response from each page. Your mind shouts, “Yes, This is truth.” As you read. Some passages leave you bleeding and stunned. Others have you shaking your head. These collections and musings are quite stirring. The truth can be quite ugly.